Bolster, Bolster’s Quarterly Magazine. Volume I. No. I (February, 1826) – Volu…

Bolster, Bolster's Quarterly Magazine. Volume I. No. I (February, 1826) - Volu

Bolster, John / [Callanan, Jeremiah Joseph] / Sloane, Hans / Bolster’s Quarterly Magazine. Volume I. No. I (February, 1826) – Volume I. No. IV (November, 1826). Cork, John Bolster, Patrick Street, 1826. Octavo. VIII, 394 pages. Hardcover / Original Half-Leather with gilt lettering on spine. Good condition iwth some rubbing and bumpin to the boards and corners. Interior very good with only occasional signs of foxing. A very rare Cork publication with some extremely scarce, often anonymously published essays on local history, poetry etc. The publications signed with J.J.C. are by Corkonian Jeremiah Joseph Callanan. Name of 19th century preowner on endpaper: “Michael Higgins”.

Includes for example the following essays: On the cultivation of the Tritoma Uvaria, in the South of Ireland, by the Rev. S. Hans Sloane / Posthumous Letters of “Amy Grey” / Biographical Sketch of Thomas Campbell by Washington Irving / Sir Walter Scott in Ireland / The Town of Galway / A Wake in the Irish Highlands / Tiarna na clanna Mac Diarmuidh – An Irish Legend / Lamentation of Felix McCarthy / Cusheen Log / On the Last Day [Callanan] / Killarneyx during the Races / Irish County Histories / O’Driscoll, An Irish Tale / The Migration of Birds and on the Birds of Ireland / May Eve , An irish legend / The Amulet for 1827 / The Song of the Little Bird, a legend of the South of Ireland by T. Croften Croker etc. etc. etc.

Jeremiah Joseph Callanan (1795–1829) was an Irish poet born in County Cork, Ireland.
Callanan studied for Catholic priesthood at Maynooth College, and afterwards law at Trinity College, Dublin, where he won two prizes for his poems. Afterward, he found employment teaching briefly at a school in his hometown of Cork.
Callanan also contributed translations of Irish verse to Blackwood’s Magazine before traveling to Lisbon to work as a tutor in 1827. Jeremiah Callanan died in Lisbon in 1829, as he was preparing to return to Ireland.
His great-niece is Academy Award-nominated actress Pauline Collins.
″The Outlaw of Loch Lene,” Callanan’s most well-known poem, begins with the line, “O many a day have I made good ale in the glen”. It is one of the two Callanan poems included in Brendan Kennelly’s The Penguin Book of Irish Verse (1970) the other one being “The Convict of Clonmel”. Both are translations from the Irish. Books of poetry were: Recluse of Inchidony, and other Poems. 1830 / Poems (ed. M.F. McCarthy). 1847. (Wikipedia)

Our price: EUR 480,-- 

Bolster's Quarterly Magazine. Volume I. No. I (February, 1826)  -  Volume I. No. IV (November, 1826).
Bolster's Quarterly Magazine. Volume I. No. I (February, 1826)  -  Volume I. No.