Estienne, Tes kaines diathekes hapanta = Novum Iesu Christi D.N. Testamentum: ex…

Estienne, Tes kaines diathekes hapanta = Novum Iesu Christi D.N. Testamentum: ex

Estienne, Robert [Robertus Stephanus] [New Testament / 16th century Typography / Typographical Revolution] Tes kaines diathekes hapanta = Novum Iesu Christi D.N. Testamentum: ex Bibliotheca Regia. Third Edition of Estienne’s New testament, the so-called ‘Editio Regia’. Lutetiae [Paris], Ex Officina Roberti Stephani, 1550. Folio (24 cm x 34.5 cm). Collation complete. Pagination: Titlepage with woodcut, [15], 272, [1], 202, [1] pages including colophon. Striking 18th century green morocco with new spinelabels. This important publication has considerable wormhole-damage to the bottom right corner of the bookblock throughout BUT the text is never effected. The wormhole damage has been professionally treated by one of the world’s leading bookbinderies and restorers (Bayntun in Bath). The bottom right corner of the titlepage has been professionally restored as an example for possible future restoration of the complete volume. The wonderful morroco binding is firm and fully intact. Despite the wormhole-damage, the binding and the bookblock are in very good condition with only minor signs of external wear. One minor inkstain on pages 103/104. Otherwise the paper bright and strong in print. Especially the fact that the text is not effected by the wormholes makes this typographical masterpiece still a very desirable addition to any collector’s library and at a very affordable price for one the most sought after books in printing history of the Renaissance.

The Center for the Study of New Testament Manuscripts writes about Estienne’s Editio Regia: “Robert Estienne (a.k.a. Stephanus) published four Greek New Testaments in the sixteenth century (1546, 1549, 1550, and 1551). The first three editions of his Novum Testamentum were published in Paris, the fourth in Geneva. His third edition of 1550 was affectionately known as Editio Regia, because of the magnificent Greek font and large folio size of the codex. Not only the most handsome, the 1550 Stephanus is also the most important of his texts. This was the first published Greek New Testament to have a textual apparatus. Stephanus examined 15 manuscripts and listed several of their readings in the margins of his Editio Regia. Stephanus’s fourth edition was the first to have verse divisions in it, a feature that Stephanus invented to help the reader more easily compare the two Latin translations and the Greek that are found in the fourth edition. Though the text of the third and fourth editions was virtually identical, the fourth became the basis for the Geneva Bible, the first Bible translation to have verse divisions. The 1550 Stephanus also became the standard text to be used as a collating base for countless collations of Greek New Testament manuscripts.”

Our price: EUR 5.800,-- 

Estienne, Tes kaines diathekes hapanta = Novum Iesu Christi D.N. Testamentum
Estienne, Tes kaines diathekes hapanta = Novum Iesu Christi D.N. Testamentum:
Estienne, Tes kaines diathekes hapanta = Novum Iesu Christi D.N. Testamentum:
Estienne, Tes kaines diathekes hapanta = Novum Iesu Christi D.N. Testamentum:
Estienne, Tes kaines diathekes hapanta = Novum Iesu Christi D.N. Testamentum: